ShooTAG Flea Control without Toxins

Shoo Tags target fleas, ticks or mosquitos to protect your pet against them. They do not work in tackling those not on the animal however–such as the surrounding environment.

One of the nice things about this age of going green is that there are new products coming out that are less topic options than in the past.

Shoo Tags™ is one of these products that made a hit at one of the big pet industry shows.

However, I did not find any scientific studies to support the claims although I did came across some discussions of how they don’t work for some people.

The shelf life of inactivated tags is two years and once on the pet, they are supposed to last up to four months.

Shoo! TAGS™ work by using frequencies embedded in the magnetic strip that are supposed to be similar to the Schumann Wave and not like harmful radio frequencies.

The specific insects targeted by the tags do not like those energetics. (The manufacturers state that Shoo!TAG™ products do not interfere with radio frequencies or radio collars.)

Once on the pet (or human) it takes time for the energy field to extend the pest barrier frequencies into the energy field of the being wearing the tag.

During testing the manufacturers found that activation can take up to 36 hours.

They also found that animals that have weaker energy fields (those who are on or have recently taken steroid drugs, that have recently undergone surgery, or who are older) do not respond well to the product.

One of the misunderstood aspects of this product is that it does not kill the pests but simply slows them down and gets them to leave the pet’s energy field.

The tag frequency can be effected if they rub against other metal tags or become bent, scratched or damaged.

In addition, the company states that there could also be a problem if there are nearby fault lines, cell phone towers and large doses of pesticides.

The company states also that green products typically have around a 75% effective rate and so although ShooTAGS is a nice option is can only be part of an entire flea control program.

What is the best flea treatment for your pet?

best flea treatment

One of the most asked questions is, “What is the best flea treatment?”

The answer can vary greatly depending on who you talk to but the real question should be, “What is the best flea treatment for my pet and my household?”

For instance, in my area most people do not need to use flea control unless they head out on a trip or have company that arrives with a flea infested pet.

Because we live in the high altitude with arid conditions and temperatures that don’t allow a flea population to take hold and cycle, our biggest issues are from visitors with pets or from ticks.

A bath in non-toxic oatmeal shampoo (with suds left to sit for 10-15 minutes) is enough to thwart any fleas that might have been brought up to the area.

If you live in an area where feral animals invade your yard or strays visit often–your chances of a flea infestation can increase drastically.

Recently a reader wrote in about an infestation cycle at the beach.

Her problem was that rats were bringing fleas into the home where they multiplied and plagued both pets and humans.

So where you live is part of the consideration in coming up with a good solutions because beach living is certainly a bigger problem than where I live and regions vary as to what types of flea products you can obtain.

The other consideration concerns how much money you want to invest in products or services AND how much toxicity you are willing to bring into your home or yard.

Some products work better than others but the true secret is that you need to use the Triangle of Successful Flea Control to tackle the issue.

This means treating the animal, interior area of the home, and the surrounding exterior areas at the same time.

Both the interior and exterior areas have to be treated at least every two weeks until you get the problem under control and then regularly after that to get rid of fleas for good.

Although some areas allegedly report a decrease in flea populations, I highly doubt that is the case. With more sophisticated options for treating fleas I think it is just that people are not encountering the same high level of problems as has been the case in the past and they are not calling in pest control people but treating it themselves or with services that provide less toxic options.

Anyway, I just wanted to make sure you don’t fall for the “best flea treatment is…” message.

My answer to the question is this, “The best flea treatment is the one that works for you, eliminates fleas from your pet and your home safely, and that fits into your budget.

We all have our favorites so take the time to talk to your veterinarian or pet care professional to see what they recommend.

Don’t forget that you can read Flea Control Secrets for help in sorting out the vast selection of products on the market (both natural and proprietary) and to learn about all the different options available to you and your pet.

Photo Credit: Pfala

How to get rid of fleas in Ohio? (Subscriber Question)

Recently Flea Control Secrets received an email from a subscriber (Peter) who had a multiple part inquiry.

The person owns three thick coated dogs and said that he cannot get the Frontline Plus drops delivered to the hair follicles at the base of the skin by the shoulder blades.

So instead, he put the drops on their chest near the stomach and wondered how it would be distributed.

He was fortunate that the dogs did not lick it off but wondered if it was okay to apply it near the stomach or belly of a pet.

So, my response to this first part of the question is this—do not take a risk of applying your flea treatment product to pets except as directed.

If you are having issues with application—get some help from a groomer or a veterinarian.

I’ve never met a dog with a coat so thick that application was impossible.

You could use some clips to hold the dog hair to the side to apply it or even clip a small are shorter if you want to use the spot-on products.

The big issue with not following the instructions of spot-on products is that many animals have experienced illness or death from improper application.

In multiple animal households, you also must monitor the pets to make sure that they do not ingest the product by licking one another.

(I would encourage you to check out the flea control kits in the sidebar as less toxic options.)

Excerpt from Flea Control Secrets eBook:

Frontline® Plus combines an antiparasitic agent with an insect growth regulator in a topical formula that kills the eggs, larva, adult fleas, chewing lice, and all stages of ticks.

Merial’s Frontline Plus® combines both Fipronil and Methoprene.

Frontline® (Fipronil) kills fleas AND ticks for up to a month and affects the spinal cord and brain of the ecto-parasites.

Topical application is done on the skin between the pet’s shoulder blades so it wicks back over the pet’s body.

Fipronil remains effective after swimming and bathing. Even so, water immersion should be avoided until 48 hours after application.

The next challenge of his issue is the outdoor flea problem since there are feral animals (squirrels, rabbits, raccoons, birds) that enter the large property which is fenced in.

Flea season runs from April through October or until the temperatures drop (along with the humidity) so ongoing efforts need to be maintained.

At the moment the household is using Spectracide granules and then waited two months before doing a second application. This time the product used was Ortho granules but the time lag in between works against you.

The issue this household faces is that when you begin flea control efforts, you must be diligent in those efforts and treat the outside, inside, and the animal all at the same time.

Also, fleas are very hardy insects so make sure the products being used work specifically for fleas.

Personally, for outdoor products I prefer to use natural, less toxic methods that are more environmentally friendly. You can also use a yard sprayer to help with better dispersement.

Remember to also adapt your efforts to reflect the natural flea cycle. So this means treating the outside areas more frequently and making sure bedding and interior areas are also treated at the same time would be ideal.

You’ll need to treat more frequently than has been done–daily vacuuming and more frequently application of flea treatment products (for the interior and exterior areas)–every two weeks for eight weeks at least.

I was glad to hear that the family is going to be using diatomaceous earth and nematodes but again, make sure that you cycle the treatment at least every two weeks for the time being.

There are deterrents that can be used to discourage the entrance of feral animals but the consistency of treatment should work without investing in animal deterrents.

Recently, the pet owner purchased Capstar tablets and gave it to two of the three dogs.

This is a great option and many people use it in conjunction with a topic flea control but don’t combine it with another oral product unless specifically directed to do so by your veterinarian.

Excerpt from Flea Control Secrets eBook:

Capstar® (Nitenpyram) is an oral treatment that kills adult fleas by interfering with nerve transmission in the flea.

Studies reported more than 90% effectiveness against adult fleas within four to six hours depending on the species.

Unfortunately Capstar® does not kill immature fleas, larvae, or eggs so it is necessary to combine its use with an Insect Growth Regulator.

It is also possible to use less toxic food grade ditomaceous dust on the pets—although it can be a bit drying.

Although much of the flea control products can be purchased without going to a veterinarian, I would encourage a veterinary visit for confirmation on the choices being made AND because the animals are likely to have internal parasites as a result of a flea infestation.

I am glad you have watched the videos and are doing all you can do to solve the flea infestation issue.

Remember, once you get a flea infestation it is important to remain diligent in your efforts to get it under control and manage it.

Since you did not mention interior treatments so I’d suggest Flea Busters RX and also trying some Parasite Dust.

I would also recommend reviewing the Flea Control Secrets videos on Seven Flea Control Strategies and the Triangle of Successful Flea Control and if you have not purchased the Flea Control Secrets eBook–you’ll find a whole lot more information to help you get rid of fleas.

Thanks for your question and let me know how it goes.

Lufenuron (Program®) Flea Treatment

Program cat flea treatmentProgram Flea Treatment (Lufenuron) is one of the more popular flea control products. Lufenuron dosage is based on your pet’s weight and species.

It is critical to avoid giving a dog product to a cat and a cat product to a dog. If you haven’t heard about the many issues under investigation by the EPA–part of the problem is thought to be the misuse of products by pet owners by applying flea control products to the wrong species or overdosing due to inaccurate weight estimation. (Best to err on the side of caution.)

The Program flea medication is given once a month.

Lufenuron is administered orally for dogs but cats can receive a pill, liquid suspension, or injection. Program sterilizes the females and so interrupts the flea life cycle.

Eggs cease to hatch within seven days after this product is ingested but adult flea bites can still cause irritation and other complications.

Until the effects take effect, additional flea control methods need to be implemented to reduce the existing flea population.

Some caution is necessary when using this product but Program is considered one of the better products on the market.

Program and most of the best home flea remedies and flea control medications are outlined in Flea Control Secrets.

Pet Flea Infestation (Video)

People often ask how they can tell if their animal has fleas–which surprises me since anyone who pays attention to their animal should be alert to some of the warning signs.

Some signs of a flea infestation include:

  • excessive scratching,
  • black insects crawling on pet,
  • presence of flea dirt on animal and animal bedding, and
  • increased chewing and licking.

In this video the animal is severely infested with fleas and is being cleaned by a grooming professional. The reddish brown water is actually flea dirt.

Flea dirt is the poop of fleas and what flea larvae feed on. The amount of fleas are only some of of the entire problem. The home and yard should be treated since the other 95% of flea populations are made up of flea eggs, flea larvae, and flea pupae–only 5% of any infestation are adult fleas.

I’d also get the animal into the vet for an exam to rule out flea bite anemia and for deworming.

The point to all this is to encourage people to not wait to implement flea control to avoid a bigger problem and complications–and the additional expense of professional grooming and veterinary care–not to mention the health risks to pets from flea infestations.

Flea Treatment for Pregnant Dog & Puppies

dog with puppies flea treatment Lately I’ve been seeing a lot of people asking about whether or not flea treatment can be safely used on dogs with puppies.

The safest answer is: Do NOT use commercial flea treatment on your pet if it is nursing puppies and do NOT use flea control products on the puppies.

Most pesticides are not safe for use on puppies less than eight weeks of age and so you should avoid treating the mother while she is nursing unless your veterinarian has told you specifically to do so.

However, you can use a few strategies prior to whelping and during the time those pups are growing.

First, ask your veterinarian if and when you need to stop using topic flea treatment on your pet before she whelps.

Your vet will be able to make specific recommendations for you that will help pets stay safe and flea free.

Since you have a couple of months to prepare, begin flea treatment when you suspect your pet is pregnant or if you know you are going to breed your pet. Doing this gives you time to use topical flea treatment and other strategies without worry.

Also, if you treat the home, exterior areas, and the pet at the same time, you will have the fleas under control prior to the birth of any puppies.

It takes about eight weeks to totally get rid of fleas using the triangle of successful flea control.

Other flea control tips:

  • Non-toxic diatomaceous earth (DE) can be spread in the carpets and flooring–vacuum up after three to five days.
  • Use DE on your pet as a flea dust–just apply in a well ventilated area. (Learn more about diatomaceous earth for flea control.)
  • In addition, try parasitic nematodes in the yard. They prey on fleas at different stages of their development. Add more every three weeks.
  • Daily cleaning is a must when using any flea control methods. Dust, vacuum, and mop.
  • Try using a sheet over pet bedding and change out daily.
  • Wash pet bedding and sheets in hot water with lavender or other flea fighting oils (rosemary, thyme, cedarwood) as this will help repel fleas further.
  • Since many essential oils can be toxic to pets just use in the laundry.
  • Cedarwood chips inside pet beds and in the garden will repel fleas.
  • Flea combs work great for dogs and puppies. Comb daily to remove fleas and flea dirt.
  • Bathing a pup in mild baby shampoo or using a water dip helps–just make sure to dry the pups and prevent them from chilling.